News Flash

Home

Posted on: July 21, 2020

Mosquito Season: West Nile Virus Detected in Mosquito Sample in Signal Hill

Mosquitoes (1)

The Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District says it recently detected West Nile Virus (WNV) in a mosquito sample within Signal Hill city limits. Signal Hill is now one of 13 areas in L.A. County with confirmed samples of WNV. For up-to-date numbers, please go to: https://www.glacvcd.org/mosquito-borne-diseases/latest-west-nile-virus-statistics/.

We are in peak mosquito season, and these insects are a public health risk. Mosquitoes can transmit viruses like WNV to people and animals by biting humans. There is no cure for WNV. Symptoms can include fever, headache, body aches, nausea, or a skin rash. There is no human vaccine for WNV, and severe cases can lead to paralysis or even death. Please take steps to protect our community from mosquitoes. Whenever you’re outside, use mosquito repellent to reduce bites.

Reduce mosquito population growth by eliminating sources of standing water from outside of your home. Take the Tip, Toss and Take Action Pledge: TIP out any standing water, TOSS out any unneeded container that can collect water, and TAKE ACTION by sharing mosquito prevention tips with others.

  • Eliminate standing water in clogged rain gutters, rain barrels, discarded tires, buckets, watering troughs or anything that holds water for more than a week.
  • Ensure that swimming pools, spas, and ponds are properly maintained.
  • Change the water in pet dishes, birdbaths and other small containers weekly. 
  • Request mosquitofish from the county vector control district for placement in ornamental ponds.
  • Wear insect repellent when outdoors where mosquitoes may be present. 
  • Report neglected (green) swimming pools in your neighborhood to the L.A. County Vector Control District: 562-944-9656.
  • Check out this DIY mosquito solutions checklist from GLACVCD.

Mosquito control is a shared responsibility and residents are strongly encouraged to take an active role in reducing the threat of WNV in their neighborhoods.


Facebook Twitter Email